A brain injury doesn’t just change the life of the individual; it changes the lives of everyone around them.

  • **Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability globally and thus is a major public health importance.
  • **TBI is more common than breast cancer, spinal cord injury, HIV/AIDS, and multiple sclerosis combined.
  • **Over 170,000 Canadians incur a brain injury each year – that is 465 people each day – one every 3 minutes.
  • **A Concussion is a Brain Injury.

It is estimated that 1.4 million Canadians (500,000 in Ontario) live with a disability (cognitive, behavorial, psychological, emotional, physical) as a result of a Brain Injury. Brain Injuries can effect people from the ages of 0-99.

In an instant a life is changed, forever. Everyday, we particpate in activities that produce endless risks for sustaining a brain injury: Falls, Motor Vehicle & Traffic Crashes, Assault, Struck By / Against Events in a variety of activities and not limited to just sports. The Brain Injury Association of Canada’s mission is to improve the quality of life for all Canadians affected by an acquired brain injury and promoting its prevention. Prevention through public education and safety legislation is the key to reducing the occurence of brain injuries amongst Canadians.

For more information on Brain Injuries visit www.biac-aclc.ca or http://twitter.com/biacaclc

Information about Brain Injury Community

  • Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability globally and, thus is of major public health importance.
  • TBI is more common than breast cancer, spinal cord injury, HIV/AIDS, and multiple sclerosis (MS) combined.
  • In the province of Ontario where there are two million people diagnosed with a neurological condition; 500,000 people have an acquired brain injury (ABI) as a result of TBI’s and / or multiple mTBI’s.

What are the Leading Causes of TBI?

  • Falls (35.2%);
  • Motor vehicle – traffic (17.3%);
  • Struck by/against events (16.5%);
  • Assaults (10%) and
  • Other / Unknown (21%)

Falls

Falls continued to be the leading cause of TBI (35.2%) in the United States. Falls cause half (50%) of the TBIs among children aged 0 to 14 years and 61% of all TBIs among adults aged 65 years and older.

Motor Vehicle-Traffic Crashes

Among all age groups, motor vehicle crashes and traffic-related incidents were the second leading cause of TBI (17.3%) and resulted in the largest percentage of TBI-related deaths (31.8%).

Struck By/Against Events

Struck by/against events, which include colliding with a moving or stationary object, were the second leading cause of TBI among children aged 0 to 14 years, with 25%.

Assault

Assaults produced 10% of TBIs in the general population; they accounted for only 2.9% in children aged 0 to 14 years and 1% in adults aged 65 years old and older.

Who is at Risk?

  • Approximately 18% of all TBI-related emergency department visits involved children aged 0 to 4 years.
  • Approximately 22% of all TBI-related hospitalizations involved adults aged 75 years and older.
  • Males are more often diagnosed with a TBI (59%).

Blasts are a leading cause of TBI for active duty military personnel in war zones. CDC estimates of TBI do not include injuries seen at U.S. Department of Defense or U.S. Veterans Health Administration Hospitals. For more information about TBI in the military including an interactive website for service members, veterans, and families and caregivers, please visit: www.TraumaticBrainInjuryAtoZ.org.

Traumatic Brain Injury and Domestic Violence-Understanding the Intersections
This Special Collection offers information about the intersection between domestic violence and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). It provides advocates and other professionals with tools to screen for TBI within the context of domestic violence as well as presentations, articles, and other relevant resources on the topic. The purpose of this collection is to: 1) increase knowledge and understanding of TBI within the context of domestic violence, 2) provide tools to advocates and other professionals to screen domestic violence survivors for TBI, and 3) highlight best practices.

Access this Special Collection at: http://www.vawnet.org/category/index_pages.php?category_id=1075.

Brain Injury Association of Canada – Our Cause: Acquired Brain Injury

In an instant a life is changed, forever. Everyday we participate in activities that produce endless risks for sustaining a brain injury: car accidents, a fall from a bike, or a blow to the head. It is estimated that thousands of Canadians incur a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), also known as a concussion, each year, the majority being young adults. Statistics indicate that the incidence of brain injury is two times greater in men. The Brain Injury Association of Canada (BIAC) strives to raise awareness of the incidence of acquired brain injury (ABI) in Canada.

A brain injury may make it necessary for the injured person to require full time assistance. Families often become the primary caregiver and support person. Many families are left to cope on their own. They sometimes have little understanding of the effects of the injury and the demands that will be made of them by an injured family member. Families need support from others who understand the effects of acquired brain injury. The Brain Injury Association of Canada (BIAC) provides a shared forum for the support of both families and survivors. BIAC also advocates for the enhancement of support services.

Prevention through public education, and safety legislation is the key to the reducing the occurrence of ABI amongst Canadians. The Brain Injury Association of Canada engages in extensive public education initiatives through its many local community associations across Canada.

Neuroscience and injury prevention research is another key to addressing ABI. The Brain Injury Association of Canada endeavours to support and promote research in Canada and internationally.

Brain Injury Association of Canada – Our Mission

At the founding meeting in July 2003 in Montreal, members from brain injury associations from across Canada, representing survivors, families, medical and research professionals identified the need to create the Brain Injury Association of Canada.

Our mandate is to improve the quality of life for all Canadians affected by acquired brain injury and promote its prevention. BIAC is dedicated to the facilitation of post-trauma research, education and advocacy in partnership with national, provincial/territorial and regional associations and other stakeholders.

BIAC is incorporated as a national charitable organization under the Canada Corporations Act and the Canada Revenue Agency.

The Brain Injury Association of Canada is a proud member of the Neurological Health Charities of Canada

  • approximately 5.6 million Canadians live with a neurological condition and 5 million Canadians live with a mental illness today – that’s 1 in 3 Canadians living with a brain condition
  • by extrapolating data from Ontario where 25% of the people living with a neurolgical condition are brain injury survivors, one can note that there are approximately 1.4 million Canadians living with an acquired brain injury
  • regardless of diagnosis, people living with brain conditions share remarkably similar needs and challenges
  • Canada’s neurological health charities have been working together to address these common needs
  • we have developed a 7-pillar framework for a national brain strategy that when implemented, will improve the quality of life for millions and millions of Canadians

The 7 pillars of the national brain and brain injury strategy are:

  1. research
  2. prevention
  3. integrated care and support
  4. caregiver support
  5. income security
  6. public education
  7. genetic privacy

Brain Injury Association of Canada
155 Queen St, Suite 808
Ottawa, Ontario
K1P 6L1
Phone: 613-762-1222
Fax: 613-236-5208
Web: www.biac-aclc.ca
Twitter: http://twitter.com/biacaclc.

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